Certificate in After School Education

Overview of the Certificate Program
General Information and Goals of the Certificate Program
Rationale for the Certificate Program
Overview of Certificate Program Curriculum
Certificate Program Coursework and Fieldwork Requirements
Other Certificate Program Requirements
Certificate Program Satisfies Most Minor Requirements for Educational Studies
Funding and Support for the Certificate Program
Further Information
References
FAQs


Overview of the Certificate Program

Initiated in Fall 2008, the School of Education Certificate in After-school Education (CASE) provides a combination of classroom instruction and supervised fieldwork across a sequence of courses offered through the School of Education. Students completing CASE requirements gain:

1) basic knowledge in child or adolescent development;
2) core knowledge in theory, research, and evaluation of after-school programs and activities; and
3) practical skills working with, and developing quality programming for, children and adolescents in after-school settings.


General Information and Goals of the Certificate Program

The School of Education's undergraduate Certificate in After-school Education is the first such program in the country. The program builds on a growing body of research about the positive outcomes for children and youth who participate in high quality after-school programs on a regular basis. We use the term “after-school programs” to refer broadly to programs that provide educational enrichment and academic support outside of the formal school day setting.

This certificate program recognizes the critical need for quality curriculum and well-trained after-school program personnel in order to achieve positive outcomes. After-school education research by School of Education faculty members Deborah Vandell and Joseph Mahoney (e.g., Mahoney, Parente, & Zigler (in press); Mahoney, Vandell, Simpkins, & Zarrett (2009); Vandell, Pierce, & Dadisman, 2005; Vandell & Posner, 1999) informed the design of the proposed certificate program, which seeks to achieve the following goals:

  • Provide UCI undergraduates with foundational knowledge about historical perspectives and policy initiatives in after-school education, as well as current research that identifies the predictors for positive participant outcomes in after-school programs.
  • Develop in UCI undergraduates an understanding of child and adolescent development and the need to match after-school experiences with the interests, needs, and developmental level of program participants.
  • Expose UCI undergraduates to different after-school program models, and develop their practical knowledge about program evaluation so that they can critically assess program strengths and weaknesses.
  • Provide UCI undergraduates with comprehensive fieldwork experiences where they develop their abilities to design and implement high quality after-school program activities for children and adolescents in the programs that they serve.
  • Build UCI undergraduates’ awareness of how this certificate program provides a foundation for career options in after-school education, K-12 teaching, or other education-related careers, as well as graduate study opportunities.

We expect a primary audience for this certificate program to be UCI undergraduates who are interested in serving children and youth in after-school program settings and in developing their abilities to assess and contribute to the quality of those programs. However, the School of Education will also collaborate with UCI Extension and its ACCESS UCI program to advertise and make the courses for the Certificate in After-school Education available to active or prospective after-school program personnel who are not enrolled in UCI degree programs.


Rationale for the Certificate Program

Research has demonstrated that young people are likely to development academic, social, and physical competencies as a result of participating in high quality after-school programs on a regular basis. Additionally, research suggests that the adult staff who provide after-school activities are the key to program quality (e.g., Mahoney, & Stattin, 2000; Pierce, Hamm, & Vandell, 1999; Rosenthal & Vandell, 1996). Unfortunately, adults who staff after-school programs often receive little formal training that would allow them to provide quality programming. Likewise, institutions of higher learning have seldom provided education or training to students that are focused on serving young people in after-school program settings.

The School of Education Certificate in After-school Education helps to address this educational gap by expanding opportunities for undergraduates to become involved in coursework and fieldwork experiences that expose them to a variety of program models with multi-age and diverse participant populations and with different program foci. The School of Education has partnered with selected after-school program providers across Orange County to offer undergraduates practical field experience at sites that address a variety of after-school program skill sets (e.g., literacy, technology, arts, math/science, sports and physical education), and that serve children and youth who are racially/ethnically diverse, economically disadvantaged, and in need of academic assistance. Research has shown that those students who are at the highest risk for developing social-academic adjustment problems sometimes benefit the most from high quality after-school programs (Cosden, Morrison, Albanese, & Macias, 2001; Mahoney, 2000; Mahoney & Cairns, 1997; Welsh, Russell, Williams, Reisner, & White, 2002). Our after-school program partners for this certificate program are able to serve more of their at-risk participants through the support that UC Irvine undergraduates provide.

The following organizations or schools represent core sites that have partnered with the School of Education to offer fieldwork placements for UCI students: KidWorks, Newport-Mesa Project Success at College Park Elementary, Think Together, Turtle Rock Community Park, UCI Extended Day Center, and Girls Incorporated.


Overview of Certificate Program Curriculum

A minimum of six courses totaling 24 quarter units are required for completion of the Certificate in After-School Education, along with a minimum 70 hours of field experience. Two required courses provide a theoretical grounding and foundational knowledge regarding historical and current issues and policy in after-school education, program curriculum, predictors for desired outcomes, and relevant issues in child and adolescent development and learning and multicultural education. Students select three courses that focus on teaching, learning, and academic enrichment in particular subject areas; these courses provide UCI students with opportunities to design, implement, and evaluate high quality program activities for children and adolescents in regional after-school programs. Finally, students enroll in a CASE capstone course during which they put what they have learned into practice during a minimum of 50 hours of fieldwork at an after school program.


Certificate Program Coursework and Fieldwork Requirements

To earn a Certificate in After-school Education, UCI students must complete a minimum of six courses totaling 24 quarter units and a minimum of 70 fieldwork hours.

Foundations Course: Complete EDUC 160 “Foundations of Out of School Learning” (4 units). The course includes 20 hours of fieldwork at an instructor-approved after-school program. Students are highly encouraged to complete this course prior to other courses in the certificate program.

Human Development, Multicultural Education, or Exceptional Learners Course: Select one course from the following:

Option (A) EDUC 107 “Child Development in Education” (4 units)

Option (B) EDUC 108 “Adolescent Development in Education” (4 units)

Option (C) EDUC 124 "Multicultural Education" (4 units)

Option (D) EDUC 128 “Exceptional Learners” (4 units)

Course Focused on Academic Curricula in After-school Programs: Complete a minimum of one course that addresses academic curricula (e.g., reading, writing, literacy, mathematics, and science) in after-school programs. Select one course from the following:

Option (A) EDUC 132 “Reading and Writing Enrichment for After-school Programs” (4 units). The course includes fieldwork.

Option (B ) EDUC 100 “Educational Strategies for Tutoring and Teacher Aiding" (4 units). The course includes fieldwork.

Option (C) EDUC 122 A, B, or C "Foundations of Elementary School Mathematics I, II, III" (4 units).

Option (D): EDUC 138 “Children’s Literature in the Elementary Classroom” (4 units)

Option (E): EDUC 161 “Discovering Science in Out-of-School Hours” (4 units). The course includes fieldwork.

Course Focused on Expanded Learning Curricula in After-School Programs: Complete a minimum of one course that addresses expanded learning curricula (e.g., arts, athletics, tutoring, and technology) in after-school programs. Select from the following:

Option (A) EDUC 104D “Preparation for Teaching Fine Arts in K-12 Schools” (4 units). The course includes fieldwork.

Option (B) EDUC 137 “Art in the Elementary School” (4 units). The course includes fieldwork.

Option (C) EDUC 190 “Principles and Practices of K–6 After School Sports and Fitness (4 units). This course includes fieldwork.

Option (D) EDUC 131 "Educational Technology" (4 units). This course includes fieldwork.

One Elective Course: Complete one additional course selected from either the Academic Curricula or the Expanded Learning Curricula categories. The additional course should not duplicate the conent area, i.e., only one math class will count towards the certificate; only one arts course will count toward the certificate, etc.

CASE Capstone Course: Complete EDUC 191 “Advanced Fieldwork in After-School Education” (4 units). For this capstone experience, students are required to complete a minimum of 50 hours of fieldwork and related assignments at an instructor-approved after-school program. Prerequisite: EDUC 160.  In additional to EDUC 160, students should have completed a minimum of 3 other CASE courses prior to enrolling in EDUC 191.  Enrollment will require instructor consent.


Other Certificate Program Requirements

  • Residence Requirement: A minimum of five certificate program courses must be successfully completed at UCI.

  • Course Substitutions: Any course substitutions or waivers must be petitioned and approved through the School of Education Student Affairs office, 2000 Education Building.

  • GPA Requirement: A student must obtain a minimum overall grade point average of at least C (2.0) for all courses required for the Certificate in After-school Education.

  • Verifying Completion: Students must meet with an academic counselor in the School of Education Student Affairs office to verify completion of all program requirements. Certificate program completion will not appear on a student’s transcript; however, the School of Education will award a paper certificate to students to acknowledge successful program completion.

Certificate Program Satisfies Most Minor Requirements for Educational Studies

The proposed certificate program was designed to complement the existing Minor in Educational Studies offered by the School of Education. While undergraduates can earn a Certificate in After-school Education without earning a Minor in Educational Studies, those who do complete the certificate can easily complete the minor requirements by completing just one additional course from the minor’s “core course” category. We expect to attract students from the certificate program to consider completing the minor. Conversely, we will attract interest in the certificate program by advertising to those students who enroll in education courses with the intention of completing the minor.


Funding and Support for the Certificate Program

Support for the Certificate in After-school Education program is provided by UC-Links, a network of scholars and practitioners across the UC system concerned with out-of-school learning and the healthy development of young people.


For Further Information Contact:

School of Education Student Affairs Office
2000 Education Building
Phone: (949) 824-3348
Email: gseinfo@uci.edu

Dr. Sue Marshall
Director of Undergraduate Programs
Phone: (949) 824-3202
Email: sue.marshall@uci.edu


References

Cosden, M., Morrison, G., Albanese, A. L., & Macias, S. (2001). When homework is no home work: After school programs for homework assistance. Journal of Educational Psychology, 36, 211-221.

Mahoney, J. L. (2000). Participation in school extracurricular activities as a moderator in the development of antisocial patterns. Child Development, 71, 502-516.

Mahoney, J. L., & Cairns, R. B. (1997). Do extracurricular activities protect against early school dropout? Developmental Psychology, 33, (2), 241-253.

Mahoney, J. L., Parente, M. E., & Zigler, E. F. (in press). Afterschool program participation and children’s development. Invited chapter to appear in J. Meece & J. Eccles (Eds.), Handbook of research on schools, schooling, and human development. Routledge

Mahoney, J. L., & Stattin, H. (2000). Leisure activities and adolescent antisocial behavior: The role of structure and social context. Journal of Adolescence, 23, 113-127.

Mahoney, J. L., Vandell, D. L., Simpkins, S., & Zarrett, N. (2009). Adolescent out-of-school activities. In R. M. Lerner & L. Steinberg (Eds.), Handbook of Adolescent Psychology (3rd ed). Vol.2: Contextual influences on adolescent development (pp. 228-267). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons.

Pierce, K. M., Hamm, J. V., & Vandell, & D. L. (1999). Experiences in after-school programs and children’s adjustment in first-grade classrooms. Child Development, 70, 756-767.

Rosenthal, R., & Vandell, D. L. (1996). Quality of care of school-aged child-care programs: Regulatable features, observed experiences, child perspectives, and parent perspectives. Child Development, 67, 2434-2445.

Vandell, D. L., & Posner, J. K. (1999). Conceptualization and measurement of children’s after-school environments. In. S. L. Friedman & T. Wachs (Eds.), Measuring environments across the lifespan: Emerging methods and concepts (pp. 167-196). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Vandell, D. L., Pierce, K. M., & Dadisman, K. (2005). Out-of-school settings as a developmental context for children and youth. In R. Kail (Ed.), Advances in Child Development, Volume 33. Oxford: Elsevier.

Welsh, M. E., Russell, C. A., Williams, I., Reisner, E. R., & White, R. N. (2002). Promoting learning and school attendance through after-school programs: Student-level changes in educational performance across TASC’s First Three Years. Washington, D.C.: Policy Studies Associates, Inc.